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    Junior Member Sweetypoo's Avatar
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    Default Canine Candida (yeast infection)

    My best friend has recently been diagnosed with Canine Candida. I am looking for a carbohydrate and grain free homemade dog food recipe and some other information that would help me get through this tough time with his constant itching and chewing on himself. He is a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier/ Poodle mix and weighs 27 kg/ 60 lbs. Here is some info i found online and I was hoping maybe someone can help me start a plan for him.

    Understanding Systemic Yeast Problems

    If you are reading this article it is probably because you are at the "end of your rope" with your petís skin and/or ear problems. Far too often when dogs are diagnosed with allergies, they are in fact really suffering from a systemic yeast infection, be it on the surface of the skin or the whole system. If this is the case, antibiotics and steroids will not clear up the source of the problem. They only address secondary bacterial infections and provide temporary relief from itching.

    Yeast problems can be caused by different yeast organisms. One is Malassezia pachydermatitis, which is a common yeast organism found on normal and abnormal canine skin and ears. Other yeast problems involve Candida Albicans, which can be systemic and the root cause of the problem. Yeast found in the body changes to its fungal form and starts to overgrow in the gut, causing toxins to leak into the body and causing a breakdown in the body's defenses (immune system). The result is that we start to see a reaction (such as a skin, coat, ear or bladder infection) and the reaction is in the whole body's system (systemic). If you understand that the skin is the biggest filter organ in the body, you can understand that this is where the junk and toxins in the body end up, causing the issues you see in your pet.

    I feel this is one of the biggest health problem facing pet owners today, as well as in humans, and the basis for many human diseases. I will tell you now, there is hope but it takes time, effort and patience on your part. So, take time to go through this information and share it with your veterinarian. I will try to keep it brief, a mini-course so to speak, but you have to do the homework! (words of wisdom from this retired professor!)

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    Junior Member Sweetypoo's Avatar
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    2). Antibiotics Can Save a Life and Compromise Health Too.

    The second issue we need to look at for yeast issues is the use of antibiotics - either "over use" of them, or using them without using a probiotic "back up" at the same time. Probiotics (beneficial yogurt like bacteria) keep the flora/fauna of the gut at good levels in the digestive track. When this flora/fauna is killed off due to antibiotics we must re-seed the gut with probiotics at the same time!!. If we don’t do this, guess what starts to grow out of control --- the yeast/fungus, which also lives in the gut and is just waiting for an opportunity to spread "like a baptist preacher's wife's fanny, at an all you can eat buffet".

    But Probiotics/Prebiotics, keep fungus/yeast at lower levels in the gut as long as it is supplied daily in your pet's diet and we can't fully depend on it on some dog foods. Once there is yeast overgrowth, probiotics alone will not push the levels back down. It requires supplements to alter the pH of the environment, kill off the yeast, remove the yeast die-off from the body, and probiotics to reseed the gut with beneficial microorganisms.

    Other things compromise the system such as hormones (seasons), steroids, stress, vaccines, medicines, toxins, flea preparations, yard sprays, household cleaners, detergents, fabric softeners etc. but the two issues I have found the worst at causing yeast/fungus overgrowth are

    1). DIET - poor quality ingredients and lacking in nutrients and variety or nutrients that are not bioavailable to the body.

    2). OVER USE OF ANTIBIOTICS with no probiotic back up given at the same time to re-seed the gut with beneficial flora.

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    Junior Member Sweetypoo's Avatar
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    Junior Member Sweetypoo's Avatar
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    Moe's elbow...

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    Junior Member Sweetypoo's Avatar
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    Random picture of a yeast infected dogs skin. It is referred to as "elephant skin"
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Junior Member Sweetypoo's Avatar
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    I have gone to the Vet many times only to have him tell me that it is a food allergy and he gave me some prednisone to help with the itch, but I am reading that this was probably the reason why my Moe is not getting any better. I have tried many different foods such as duck and sweet potato, salmon and oatmeal (all dry kibble)but I have read that carbs, grains and sugar is what causes and contributes to leaky gut syndrome I want to start making my own raw food for him but there is just to many options on the internet
    It is breaking my heart to see him going through this nightmare and I would appreciate any kind of suggestions from someone who has gone through anything simular
    Last edited by Sweetypoo; 02-06-2012 at 05:20 AM.

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    Junior Member Sweetypoo's Avatar
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    Canine Candida

    Does your dog suffer from persistent yeast infections? Many dogs suffer from canine candida, an organism classified as both a yeast and a fungus. Symptoms are often misdiagnosed as allergies or rashes, and can appear as skin outbreaks on the feet, face, underarm, underbelly, or genital areas. Yeast infections can also appear as recurring hot spots or infections of the ears, eyes, bladder, or urinary tract.

    Candida thrives on sugars and carbohydrates, which are present in most commercial pet foods. With carbohydrates as a ready food source, the organism multiplies and starts to kill the beneficial bacteria in the stomach. A common practice is to treat with antibiotics, which does kill some of the candida, but also destroys the beneficial bacteria necessary for proper digestion and body function. Moreover, after the antibiotic treatment is stopped, the overgrowth resumes, causing a vicious cycle that is difficult to reverse.

    Proper nutrition is the most critical component to treating your pet. The first step is to eliminate carbohydrates and sugars from your animal’s diet. At All is Well we recommend a raw diet, which is the purest form of nutrition for your dog. We also offer another option: “no grain” canned and kibble foods.

    Removing carbohydrates is the first step; the second step involves destroying the candida organism. This can be done by adding coconut oil to your dog’s food. Unrefined coconut oil is the best option since it retains its medicinal properties. For best results, begin with a small amount and gradually increase to the optimum dose: one teaspoon for every 10 pounds of body weight. Too much coconut oil too quickly can bring about greasy stools, diarrhea, physical fatigue, mental exhaustion, and body aches. It is important to provide plenty of drinking water during this time to help flush out the toxins.

    About two weeks after this treatment is started, it is imperative to start rebuilding the beneficial stomach bacteria. This is, achieved by adding probiotics to their food. As with the coconut oil, start slowly and build up to the desired amount (as recommended by manufacturer).

    As the environment in the digestive tracts corrects itself and the body rids itself of the physical remains and toxins produced by the organism, flu-like symptoms can develop, including exhaustion, body aches, diarrhea, and nausea. It can take days, weeks, or sometimes months to eliminate the organism. There may be some remaining itching and skin breakouts can increase during this time. Remember that you pet is getting better! Stay the course. Your pet will be rewarded with a healthier system, the holistic way.

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    Super Moderator meggels's Avatar
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    Murph had a lot of problems with yeast, raw is the only thing that has helped that. Like you said, you want to avoid pretty much all carbs, which feed the yeast pretty much. I would do purely raw meat, bone, organ and be very strict about the treats he gets (only meat's).


    Abigail Hound- Bluetick Coonhound mix
    Murph- French Bulldog

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    Senior Member NZ Raw's Avatar
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    Raw is the best way to go. Lean raw meats and fish , eggs, and apple cider vinegar. A probiotic and or yogurt. This diet completely sucks if you are a human but for a dog it is fine dining
    There is a lot of information on feeding raw and getting started here and some great people to give advise.

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    Senior Member Unosmom's Avatar
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    raw+probiotics+organic coconut oil. I'm also a fan of zymox shampoo, works wonders on yeasty dogs.

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